Posts Tagged ‘snake stamp’

nyoro nyoro / にょろにょろ

January 7, 2013

2008UK014

11 March 2008, United Kingdom
St. Patrick‘ in a sheet of Celebrating Northern Ireland
illustration: Clare Melinsky / design: Silk Pearce

Kune kune is mostly for a single object swaying or winding.  When more than one object are together going kune kune – that is nyoro nyoro!!

The third stamp of this year is from the UK, showing St. Patrick – with three snakes nyoro-nyoro-ing behind columns!  In the legend, St. Patrick was attacked by snakes when he was doing his ’40 Day Fast’ and he chased them into the sea and banished all snakes from Ireland…  Well, modern research tells us different reasons why no snakes are found on the island.

「くねくね」している生き物が集まって一緒に動いている様子が「にょろにょろ」ー という定義をしてみました。そんな感じがしませんか?

2013年の3枚目の切手はイギリスから、北アイルランドの聖人パトリックを描いたもので、背後ににょろにょろと3匹。伝説では、聖人が断食の行をしている時にヘビに襲われ、彼がヘビたちを追いつめて海に落としたのでアイルランドにはヘビがいない!のだそうです。けれど、アイルランドやグリーンランドは南半球のニュージーランドや南極大陸と同じようにもともとヘビが生息していないらしい。海を渡れなかったのですね。

kune kune / くねくね

January 6, 2013

1971Germany001

5 February 1971, Germany
‘Children’s Drawings’

In the Japanese language there are a lot of onomatopoeia terms to express movement, condition and feel of a material or its surface.  Kune kune is one of them – it means a road is winding or something sways, as in this stamp depicting a snake!

「くねくね」「のっしのっし」「ねばねば」など日本語には擬音語が多いけれど、似たような表現は英語の日常会話ではほとんど使われません。ふと口をついて出てくる擬音語が想像をかきたてることがあるようで、よく面白がられるのでした。音とビジュアルのサンプルとして、このブログで使ってみることを思いつきました。